In the days following the Steve Wynn sexual harassment media bombshell, the billionaire allegedly met with certain employees and demanded that they deny the claims in a video recording.

Steve Wynn scandal lawsuit

The Claude Baruk Salon inside Wynn Las Vegas is where many of Steve Wynn’s alleged incidents of sexual misconduct took place. (Image: Claude Baruk)

A lawsuit filed this week claims the casino mogul and Wynn Resorts founder met with salon employees on or around January 31, which was less than a week after The Wall Street Journal first broke the news that the Las Vegas visionary had allegedly been taking advantage of female workers for decades.

The suit claims Wynn gathered employees of the Claude Baruk Salon and asked anyone who had ever felt assaulted or abused to raise their hand. According to the plaintiff, who is remaining anonymous and is simply referred to as “Jane Doe” in a new Clark County Court lawsuit, no one raised their hand.

The following day, Steve Wynn reportedly arrived at the salon accompanied by a video crew, where he urged staff members to declare on camera that they had never been assaulted by the tycoon. It isn’t declared in the lawsuit filing whether any workers recorded such admissions.

The plaintiff also claims that Wynn continues to use salon services, even having manicurists come to his Wynn Resorts villa, which he must vacate by June 1, according to his exit agreement with the board of directors. A spokesman for Wynn Resorts has denied that the former CEO uses any spa services at either of his Las Vegas Strip resorts, however.

The charges in the latest suit allege assault, battery, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The Wynn board is also facing accusations of negligent hiring and aiding its CEO’s alleged misconduct.

Lawsuits Piling Up

The claim filed in Clark County this week is the third lawsuit against Steve Wynn filed in the past week.

In the two earlier suits, two women in separate litigations asserted that Wynn routinely took advantage of them. The women, now aged 36 and 49 according to their respective lawsuits, are also remaining anonymous.

The lawsuit filed February 28 claims Wynn sought out victims based on their financial dependency on their salon employment. The suit asserts that bodyguards and even German Shepherd dogs stood outside the massage room while the casino mogul forced her to perform sexual acts, with a routine $1,000 tip to her for a not-so-happy ending.

Last Thursday, another Jane Doe alleged similar experiences. Her lawyers say she too was groomed by Wynn, and coerced to engage in sexual acts with Wynn more than 50 times over a span of three years. The woman states that she received $400 each time to keep quiet.

In addition to individual workers bringing complaints against Wynn, several shareholders have sued the company and its board on grounds that it failed to properly monitor its CEO’s behavior and actions.

Is It June Yet?

Steve Wynn had enjoyed an illustrious career prior to the WSJ’s January 27 expose on his alleged sexual harassment.

He’s often credited for expanding the Las Vegas Strip and transforming the city into a luxurious destination. But now, even officials with the company he founded can’t wait to see him out.

June 1 is eviction day for Steve Wynn, as he will need to vacate the premises of his 4,500-square foot two-story villa at Wynn Las Vegas. The decadent pad overlooks what was formerly the 18th hole of Wynn Country Club.

Along with the Wynn Resorts board forcing its namesake to leave the Strip complex, the billionaire will lose his health insurance December 31, be forced to cooperate with any ongoing litigation, and all administrative services previously made available to the CEO are discontinued May 31. Wynn is also barred from engaging in any casino business for two years.