A bank cashier at a major UK bank  has been sentenced to a term of three and a half years imprisonment after being found guilty of defrauding a couple with learning difficulties of £110,000 ($170,000).

Blew Money on Roulette and Racing Bets

Gambling addict Hissan Dar reportedly spent nearly half of the stolen money on roulette machines and horse wagering at a Ladbrokes outlet just a stone’s throw away from the bank he worked in.

The 26-year-old Dar is said to have persuaded Stephen and Frances West to hand over their bank card in order to protect them against fraud. Little did they know that they were placing their savings into the hands of a scam artist.

Dar saw the opportunity to defraud the couple, who he had been advising for years, when they received an inheritance of £200,000 ($310,000) from Stephen West’s mother. You can almost picture him virtually salivating at the news of the payout being within his grasp.

He then told the couple that he was managing their finances by sorting out payments for bills, a funeral plan, and generally managing their cash. It was all, of course, just a ruse to get access to their accounts.

Betting with Their Money

What Dar was actually doing was gambling away the couple’s money, which saw him spend £36,000 ($55,000) playing his heart away on roulette machines and horse racing wagers at popular bookies Ladbrokes in Richmond, southwest London.

Dar also made cash withdrawals which amounted to £68,000 ($105,000) and credit card purchases adding up to £3,000 ($4,600). The unscrupulous banker even applied for loans amounting to tens of thousands of pounds.

It wasn’t until suspicious activity on the West’s account was noticed by colleagues at the bank that Dar was eventually busted, at which point the fraudster attempted to claim that the couple had wittered away the money themselves on an extravagant lifestyle; apparently this scam artist just didn’t know when to stop lying.

He finally admitted to the crime and has now been jailed at the Old Bailey and will have three and a half years to consider his stupidity.

“You deliberately targeted the account and therefore the very modest income of a thoroughly decent couple who had reposed a high degree of trust in your handling of their financial affairs,” scolded Judge Timothy Pontius.

“They relied on your professional acumen and advice to a significant degree given their learning difficulties and obvious lack of familiarity with the complexities of managing an account in a time of fiscal constraint and uncertainty.”

Fortunately, NatWest – the bank where Dar was employed – has compensated the couple and returned the money to them, but it will certainly be a long while until the duo will be able to trust another financial adviser.

“That financial loss is perhaps less significant to them than the undoubtedly shocking effect upon them of learning that the man in whom they had so completely placed their trust over a period of years had disgracefully abused that trust to such an extent,” added Judge Pontius during sentencing.