What Are The Odds of Dying From Coronavirus?

What Are The Odds of Dying From Coronavirus?

On Wednesday, World Health Organization declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a pandemic. There have been thousands of deaths already and tens of thousands of people infected.

It’s having a huge impact on everything around the globe, from travel to entertainment. Our industry is seeing the effects: gaming properties’ profits have plunged, the NBA has suspended its season and the NCAA has been forced to cancel college basketball tournaments. Sporting events are being cancelled around the world.

But just how much should we be panicking? Should we be joining the masses by stockpiling masks, loo roll, and tinned food? Or should we be treating it as a common bout of flu?

Casino.org decided to compare the odds of dying from coronavirus to various other possible causes of death.

Many cases of coronavirus go unreported for various reasons, so we are basing figures here off the number of current documented cases.

As you can see, you’re more likely to die from heart disease than coronavirus. It causes on average 366,800 deaths each year.

Your odds of a shark attack are slimmer than death by coronavirus, but that’s because you’re less likely to have a run in with a shark than you are with a contagious virus that’s spreading rapidly around the world. On average, five people die every year from shark attacks.

Talking of contagious viruses, during the outbreak of Swine Flu (2009-10), your likelihood of dying was 0.02%. It caused roughly 575,400 deaths. The current likelihood of dying from coronavirus is 3.4%, compared to the common flu which is <1%.

Medical experts know what the common flu is and how to vaccinate against it, so while it causes an estimated 56,000 deaths every year, it’s thought that your odds of dying from coronavirus are higher since it is a new type of virus.

The best thing you can do? Prevent yourself from getting the virus in the first place, if you can.

Wash your hands thoroughly and regularly, avoid people who are coughing and sneezing, try not to touch your eyes, nose and mouth. If you do cough or sneeze, use a tissue, bin it, and keep those hands clean.

Sources:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/summary.html
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51674743
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-flu-h1n1-pandemic/swine-flu-infected-1-in-5-death-rate-low-study-shows-idUSBRE90O0T720130125
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/2009-h1n1-pandemic.html
https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-h1n1-swine-flu-770496
https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/statistics#1
https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/qa/how-many-people-die-from-the-flu-each-year-and-how-is-it-prevented
https://www.washingtonpost.com/gdpr-consent/?next_url=https%3a%2f%2fwww.washingtonpost.com%2fhealth%2f2020%2f03%2f04%2fcoronavirus-flu-comparison%2f
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/coronavirus-disease-2019-vs-the-flu